Elective Courses

Fall 2013

 

Figure Modeling – Anne Hirsch

A posed model serves as the visual base from which students attempt to realize integrity of form in clay. Class projects include a portrait, one-third life-sized seated figure, and one-half life-sized standing figure. Outside assignments include skull study begun in class and a hand study. Strong emphasis is given both to whole sight and to abstraction of essentials – proportion spatial relationship, and axial orientation.
SCULP-4714-01   3 credits    Elective SCULP majors only
Fee: $30.00

 

WRITING: APPROACHES TO A CRITICAL PROCESS -Jennifer Joy

This is a writing-intensive seminar for seniors. Beginning with the premise that writing is a way to think creatively and critically about our work and studio process, we will experiment with multiple strategies to open up new ways of communicating about our work and to situate it in relation to other artwork and critical debates. Structured as aseries of workshops, the class will include individual and collaborative writing exercises and critiques, readings and discussions of artists’ writings and theoretical texts. Engaging both imaginative and technical approaches to finding our own writing voice.
LAEL LE59   3 credits  Course Level: Senior 

METAL FABRICATION STUDIO – Christopher Sancomb

We will explore metal by cutting, machining, bending, warping, welding, stitching, binding, and altering the materials to push and expand students skills and understanding of metal as material for sculpture. We will discuss, experiment and challenge the notion of metal as traditional industrial workhorse, or as coveted art object and embrace or reject these ideas as we create with this medium. Students will be encouraged to pursue other nontraditional uses of metal, through scavenging, collecting, transforming metal from various states into new surfaces and forms. With safety and ingenuity we will put into practice work of the hand and machine, use computer driven techniques in tandem with the deliberate and accidental to experiment with pattern, surface, line, form and color. This class is for junior sculpture majors and other students with permission of the instructor. The course will begin with a re-introduction to the equipment and safety of the metal shop environment and quickly move into discussions of process, design,engineering, fabrication and finishing of projects. This class is for junior sculpture majors and other students with permission of the instructor.Elective, Sculpture majors must choose this class or SCULP4692 during junior year. Registration by Sculpture department, course not available via web registration
SCULP 4691  3 credits Fee: $75.00

 

Casting; Transformation and Construction – Edythe Wright

This introductory course will provide students with the opportunity to explore casting methodologies in sculpture making.  There will be an emphasis on discovering and exploring the broad variety of materials and processes in sculpture today. There will be  short, improvisational projects and approaches, including: transformation of found objects, hybridity, upcycling everyday materials, object as catalyst, site specificity, etc. with the goal of deep engagement with process and prolific object making. We will look at contemporary sculpture and design, through a variety of media, for historical reference and inspiration, including occasional readings. Technical instruction/review will include various casting processes, as well as low-tech means of construction. Casting methods/materials, mechanical fasteners (screws, grommets, rivets, bolts, hinges) and a wide selection of adhesives will be explored and tested. We will be using hand tools and small power tools, and conventional as well as unorthodox mediums. Previous experience with casting and the use of power tools is not necessary, but may be beneficial, as this course will augment more in-depth technical instruction.

3 credits   Lab Fee: $200.00

 

 

 

Wintersession 2011

 

 

 

Spring 2014

 

Uninhabitable Places – Lane Myer

Most people accept and believe in many things that exhibit this phenomena because, there are many daily experiences we have with our lives that does not include our physical presence. We often respond and remember these uninhabitable experiences as though we had physically been there. Some existing formats include television programs, theater performances, movies, the internet, historic recreations, store windows, miniaturization, dioramas, postcards, fantasy, cartoons etc.

Artists and designers have benefited from actively participating and manipulating where to locate the viewer as a part of the work they are making, keeping them at bay… from architects to cake bakers. (and it works) What happens when you address these issues directly and create works that are based on our acceptance of a physically limited engagement as being reality? Class participants will be encouraged to exploit this phenomena through class assignments, and their own interests and visual pursuits.
SCULP-4690-01    3 credits

 

Casting Studio – Chris Sancomb

This course is designed to build upon the fundamental principles of mold making and casting while exploring more complex concepts, materials, and techniques. The transformative process of casting can embody the signs of growth or decay, of evolution and metamorphosis. From cellular multiplicity to large scale sculptures, casting skills enable the artist to control the sensation of the finished work through a spectrum of materials and processes. Through demonstrations then hands-on exploration, students will pursue individual projects that reflect upon themes in sculpture that utilize casting for its unique versatility. Students will have extensive exposure to a variety of traditional and nontraditional materials. Processes will include multi-part shell molds, gypsum and composite materials for shell construction, urethane and silicone rubber, castable plastics, cold cast metals, and material specific release agents. We will review the possible health hazards associated with casting, and learn safe working methods, as well as have in-class discussions about concept and craft, various fabrication and finishing methods, and uses for molds in the making sculpture. This class is for junior sculpture majors and other students with permission of the instructor. Elective, Sculpture majors must choose this class or SCULP4691 during junior year.
Registration by Sculpture department, course not available via web registration
Fee: $100.00
SCULP-4692  3 credits   Sophomore and above